Early Online (Volume - 6 | Issue - 1)

Fatal acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 15 years old boy, is it multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with COVID-19; MIS-C?

Published on: 13th January, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9396181492

Acute pancreatitis in childhood is not common and viral and bacterial infections, bile duct diseases, medications, systemic diseases, trauma, metabolic diseases, and hyperlipidemia are among the most common causes in them. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is even rarer. The clinical presentation of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children associated with COVID-19 (MIS-C) includes fever, severe illness, and the involvement of two or more organ systems, in combination with laboratory evidence of inflammation and with or without laboratory or epidemiologic evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We present a case of a 15 years old boy with fatal acute necrotizing pancreatitis that fulfilled MIS-C definition based on RCPCH (Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health) and CPSP (Canadian Pediatric Surveillance Program) criteria.
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Uncommon first diagnosis of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma with “signet-ring” cells morphology through pericardial effusion

Published on: 20th January, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9396216816

Malignant pericardial effusion is a usual and crucial exacerbation in malignancies. In some cases, pericardial effusion may be the first manifestation of the disease. Neoplastic pericarditis is extremely rare in thyroid cancer. Hereby, we describe the case of a 54-year-old man submitted to the hospital for chest pain and dyspnea. Clinical and radiological examinations were suggestive of pericardial effusion and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent pericardial drainage and surgical biopsy of a paratracheal lymph node. Pericardial biopsies were also taken. Histology study was compatible with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma with “signet-ring” cell morphology. Extended study of thyroid gland and function was performed and he was referred to oncologists for further treatment. Clinical presentation and histology are discussed emphasizing the rare correlation between pericardial pathology and metastatic thyroid carcinomas as the first diagnosis. Histopathologic findings of “signet-ring” cell morphology are very challenging for a differential diagnosis between thyroid carcinoma and other metastatic adenocarcinomas.
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Complex cyanotic congenital heart disease presenting as congenital heart block in a Nigerian infant: case report and literature review

Published on: 11th April, 2022

Background: The prevalence of cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CCHD) varies world wide. It accounts for a third of all congenital heart diseases. The common CCHD includes Tetralogy of Fallot(TOF), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR), truncus arteriosus, and tricuspid atresia (TA). Less common variants include Ebstein’s anomaly, Hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia, and single ventricle. Children of all ages can be are affected. The commonest presentation is cyanosis. Bradycardia and/or congenital heart block are rare presentations and mostly occur in the presence of an associated congenital atrioventricular block.Case report: We report a case of a 3-month-old female presenting with congenital heart block and bradycardia at 3 months of age and found to have complex cyanotic congenital heart disease on echocardiography.Conclusion: An infant presenting with bradycardia clinically should be screened for congenital heart defect as bradycardia may be an ominous sign of serious underlying cardiac defect.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat